myhonestchinesegirlfriend:

GF: Where is your shit.
Me: What??

GF: YOUR SHIT. I’m preparing your shit.
Me: Ummm…. What??

*she comes out of the closet holding bed sheets*

GF: How do you call this?
Me: Sheet.

GF: Oh shit.

light-cream-cheese:

livin-la-vida-dada:

I dressed up yesterday like this

image

but I kept getting comments on how I looked exactly like Nicki Minaj in this picture all night

image

I WAS SUPPOSED TO BE HE-MAN!!

image

Everyone disregarded that and called me Nicki for the entire night.

I tried.

image

(Source: benedicteggs-cumberbacon, via socialnetworkhell)

lizclimo:

christmas is coming. indulge. 

lizclimo:

christmas is coming. indulge. 

(Source: totallykawaii, via mechagod)

1 year ago

repress:

Do you ever want to talk to someone but

1) You feel like you’re bothering them or coming off clingy
2) You don’t have anything to say, you just want to talk to them
3) You don’t know how to hold a conversation to save your life 

(via flowerfrick)

cozydark:

Violent Birth of Supernovae |
A team of astronomers led by the University of Leicester has uncovered new evidence that suggests that X-ray detectors in space could be the first to witness new supernovae that signal the death of massive stars.
Astronomers have measured an excess of X-ray radiation in the first few minutes of collapsing massive stars, which may be the signature of the supernova shock wave first escaping from the star.
The findings have come as a surprise to Dr Rhaana Starling, of the University of Leicester Department of Physics and Astronomy whose research is published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
Dr Starling said: “The most massive stars can be tens to a hundred times larger than the Sun. When one of these giants runs out of hydrogen gas it collapses catastrophically and explodes as a supernova, blowing off its outer layers which enrich the Universe. But this is no ordinary supernova; in the explosion narrowly confined streams of material are forced out of the poles of the star at almost the speed of light. These so-called relativistic jets give rise to brief flashes of energetic gamma-radiation called gamma-ray bursts, which are picked up by monitoring instruments in Space, that in turn alert astronomers.”
Gamma-ray bursts are known to arise in stellar deaths because coincident supernovae are seen with ground-based optical telescopes about ten to twenty days after the high energy flash. The true moment of birth of a supernova, when the star’s surface reacts to the core collapse, often termed the supernova shock breakout, is missed. Only the most energetic supernovae go hand-in-hand with gamma-ray bursts, but for this sub-class it may be possible to identify X-ray emission signatures of the supernova in its infancy. If the supernova could be detected earlier, by using the X-ray early warning system, astronomers could monitor the event as it happens and pinpoint the drivers behind one of the most violent events in our Universe. continue reading

cozydark:

Violent Birth of Supernovae |

A team of astronomers led by the University of Leicester has uncovered new evidence that suggests that X-ray detectors in space could be the first to witness new supernovae that signal the death of massive stars.

Astronomers have measured an excess of X-ray radiation in the first few minutes of collapsing massive stars, which may be the signature of the supernova shock wave first escaping from the star.

The findings have come as a surprise to Dr Rhaana Starling, of the University of Leicester Department of Physics and Astronomy whose research is published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Dr Starling said: “The most massive stars can be tens to a hundred times larger than the Sun. When one of these giants runs out of hydrogen gas it collapses catastrophically and explodes as a supernova, blowing off its outer layers which enrich the Universe. But this is no ordinary supernova; in the explosion narrowly confined streams of material are forced out of the poles of the star at almost the speed of light. These so-called relativistic jets give rise to brief flashes of energetic gamma-radiation called gamma-ray bursts, which are picked up by monitoring instruments in Space, that in turn alert astronomers.”

Gamma-ray bursts are known to arise in stellar deaths because coincident supernovae are seen with ground-based optical telescopes about ten to twenty days after the high energy flash. The true moment of birth of a supernova, when the star’s surface reacts to the core collapse, often termed the supernova shock breakout, is missed. Only the most energetic supernovae go hand-in-hand with gamma-ray bursts, but for this sub-class it may be possible to identify X-ray emission signatures of the supernova in its infancy. If the supernova could be detected earlier, by using the X-ray early warning system, astronomers could monitor the event as it happens and pinpoint the drivers behind one of the most violent events in our Universe. continue reading

(Source: murderrrrrrrs)

(via llogicoma)

astronomy-to-zoology:

 Ornate Ghost Pipefish

(Solenostomus paradoxus)

also known as the Harlequin Ghost Pipefish is a pipefish of the family Solenostomidae (False Pipefish), they can be found near coral reefs of the western Pacific and Indian ocean. True to their common name they are fairly ornate and there are several mixed color morphs ranging from yellow, black and red. They can also grow up to a foot long.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Syngnathiformes-Solenostomidae-Solenostomus-paradoxus

Image 1 Source, Image 2 Source


(via earthandanimals)